Tuesday, March 27, 2012

25 Novels to Honor Women’s History Month

Check out this nice list of books to honor women for Women's History Month

Some of the books on the list are:


To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Literature doesn’t get more Southern Gothic than this dearly beloved classic of a young, Depression-era Alabama girl who learns firsthand the unjust class and race divides present in her small town. Harper Lee’s only novel continues inspiring readers who hope to find the way to shut down social divides for good.

The Lilith’s Brood Trilogy by Octavia Butler
Science-fiction’s first lady boasts a heavily embraced brew of aliens, feminism, traditional religious tales, and gender in her trilogy of novels about the last remaining humans and their relationship with extraterrestrials. Hybridization with a race of genetics aficionados seems to be the only way to preserve what’s left of mankind, and one woman serves as the matriarch.

Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
When the Nobel Prize committee rewarded this treasured American author, they specifically noted Song of Solomon as one of her greatest publishing accomplishments. Here, an African-American man grows into adulthood after a life of violence, family discord, attempted murder, and other genuinely terrifying experiences.


Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
Young Tita loves Pedro, and he returns her feelings, but he must marry her elder sister because of a staunch family tradition keeping her forever tending to her mother. Fueled by taboo passions, she channels everything into spectacular meals (recipes included!) that conjure up lush magical realist imagery.


The Map of Love by Ahdaf Soueif
The Map of Love weaves a postcolonial love story set in Egypt while revolutionaries strike back against their British overlords, appealing to fans of romance, drama, and sociopolitical commentary alike. 1999 saw Ahdaf Soueif receive a nomination for the Man Booker Prize, and while she did not receive the award, she still vaulted herself into literary history for her sharp take on imperialist inclinations.

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